Seal of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing
 
BUREAU OF ENGRAVING AND PRINTING
U.S. Department of the Treasury 


Search

Home » U.S. Currency » How Money is Made » Packaging Operations and Federal Reserve Vault


U.S. Currency

 

How Money is Made - Packaging Operations and Federal Reserve Vault
Packaging Operations is the final stage of the 32-subject currency production process before the currency is shipped to BEP's customer, the Federal Reserve. Bricks of currency are printed with a unique numbering sequence.

Packaging Operations is the final stage of the 32-subject currency production process before the currency is shipped to BEP's customer, the Federal Reserve. Bricks of currency are printed with a unique numbering sequence. Packaging operations aligns the completed skids from COPE operations and collates four bricks of currency into the proper numbering sequence for the final packaging.

 

The four bricks are shrink-wrapped using a heavy, color-coded shrink film, which is then heated to about 450°F, to create a cash-pack, consisting of four 4,000 note bricks or 16,000 notes. The machine then verifies proper sequencing, applies a new label, and then stacks 40 cash-packs on a skid.

 

The completed loads will be transferred and securely stored in the Federal Reserve Vault for future pickup and distribution by the Federal Reserve Banks.

 

Federal Reserve Vault and Packaging Total Number of Bills
4 bricks (from COPE) equal 1 cash-pack 16,000 bills
40 cash-packs equal 1 skid 640,000 bills*
*The value of the skid is 640,000 multiplied by the denomination contained, (e.g. 640,000 bills x $100 = $64,000,000).